05.31.08 -- Lobotomy

Frame from the 1959 film of “Suddenly, Last Summer”
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Saturday, May 31, 2008
Puzzle by Robert H. Wolfe, edited by Will Shortz
In Tennessee Williams's 1958 play, Suddenly, Last Summer, the protagonist is threatened with a lobotomy to stop her from telling the truth about her cousin Sebastian. The surgeon said, "I can't guarantee that a lobotomy would stop her—babbling!!!" To which her aunt responded, "That may be, maybe not, but after the operation who would believe her, Doctor?"
Four corner sets of three nine-to-ten-letter entries are the main feature of this pleasant, but characterless crossword:
Upper left, across: FATASAHOG (1. Porky); IDONTCARE (15A. “Whatever”); NUNNERIES (17A. Where habits are picked up?).
Upper right, down: SAILNEEDLE (12D. Tool for sewing canvas); NRADIATION (13. Certain atomic X-ray emission); SECONDHAND (14. Tick source).
Lower left, down: POSTMOSAIC (25. After the Pentateuchal period); INTHEAISLE (26. Between seating sections); THIRDFLOOR (27. Attic, often).
Lower right, across: PLAUSIBLE (56. Not too much of a stretch); BAWLEDOUT (59. Read the riot act); SOITSEEMS (61. “Sure looks that way”).
Two more ten-letter entries, GOINGAHEAD (29A. Proceeding); and MEDDLESOME (41A. Curious to a fault) head the remaining entries of this curiously conversational puzzle. Eight letter entries, EYETEETH (34A. Exchange for something very valuable) and THREETON (38A. Like some adult hippos). Seven-letter, KEISTER (19A. Seat); LAPTOPS (50A. Flight passengers often work on them); ACREAGE (6D. Spread statistic); DIESNON (22D. Day when courts are not in session); RENAULT (40D. One of three French auto-making brothers). Six-letter, ITLLDO (20A. “That’s good enough”); SADDEN (21A. Get down); ONHIRE (32A. Ready to get engaged?); ROLLON (40A. Product with a rotating ball); NANANA (45A. Lyric stand-in, perhaps); SILENT (47A. Clammy?); HAIRDO (7D. Top arrangement?); MALAWI (42D. Chichewa and English are its two official languages).
Five-letter -- ASONE, APSES, ASSNS, CERES, DEARE, HEALS, ILIAC, ILOST, NADIA, STETS, STILE, TILED. Four-letter -- ADIT, ADUE, ANNS, ENSE, ENYA, FINK, INGE, NETS, OBOE, PITT, PLUM, REEL, SELL, SEND, SETS, SOSA, TENT, TIDE, TONI. Three-letter -- GES, LAO, NIN, OAF, ORE, PBS, SSA.
I won’t babble on as I’ve nothing much to say about this one… perhaps it’s the lobotomy!
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Across: 10. Socs.; 16. “The Wreck of the Mary ___” (1959 film); 18. Near the hip; 24. “The Novel of the Future” author; 25. First Earl of Chatham; 35. Vertical piece in a door frame; 36. Grp. Issuing Ids; 37. Tennis star Petrova; 43. Text messaging command; 44. Meatball; 55. Not independently; 58. Jenny Craig testimonial starter; 60. Heavenly discovery of 1801. Down: 1. Obnoxious sort; 2. In unison; 3. 1956 Olympic skiing sensation ___ Sailer; 4. Saint ___ Bay, Jamaica; 5. Retaining instructions; 8. Bank deposit, of sorts; 9. Some appliances; 10. Passage to get 8-Down; 11. Bears do it; 20. “Splendor in the Grass” Oscar winner; 23. “Amarantine” Grammy winner; 36. Sportsman of the Year co-winner of 1998; 39. Cot spot; 46. Sites of some religious statues; 48. Massachusetts motto starter; 49. Court hangers; 51. “The washday miracle” sloganeer, once; 52. One found in the woods; 53. Extremely desirable; 54. Fixes; 56. Oscar show airer?; 57. Mekong Buddhist.

05.30.08 -- Rigmarole

Illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript of
Loki, a villainous Norse deity with the ability to transmogrify.
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Friday, May 30, 2008

Click here for abridged post in LARGE PRINT.

Puzzle by Nathan Last, edited by Will Shortz

RIGMAROLE (1A. Elaborate procedure) leads off this crossword as the first entry and amusingly finishes with IAMSODEAD (60A. “My parents are gonna kill me!”) -- in between we are treated to such fun fare as BEESKNEES (16A. Living end); CANITRYSOME (21D. Question while eying someone else’s plate); TAKETHERAP (25D. Be a whipping boy); FLYSOLO (39D. Eschew aid) which no one in this heavily populated puzzle will do, for there is plenty of company.

LOKI (34A. Shape-shifting giant of myth) headlines this puzzle's large cast of characters which include a JERK (10A. Creep); ASTA (38A. Four-legged film star of the ‘30s); an ORYX (46A. Animal some believe to be the source of the unicorn myth) AMONG (17A. In with) homo sapiens READE (19A. “The Wandering Heir” novelist, 1872); COEN (21A. “The Big Lebowski” director); STYNE (35A. “Just in Time” composer); ERROL (54A. “The Fog of War” director Morris); CHICOMARX (55A. Old comedian known for his unique piano-playing style); ILER (2D. He played on of TV’s Sopranos); ACKROYD (5D. Peter who wrote “The Last Testament of Oscar Wilde”); EDSEL (9D. Old bomb); JIMIHENDRIX (10D. Follower of Sha Na Na at Woodstock); SHEA (50D. Jets used to be seen there); SADE (35D. She had a 1993 hit with “No Ordinary Love”); RICCI (45D. Golden Globe-nominated actress for “The Opposite of Sex,” 1998); RANEES (6D. Eastern Royals); OCEANAUTS (7D. Sealab inhabitants); and a PIXIE (15A. Playful trickster).

Dry stuff includes OLEICACID (14A. Soapmaking compound); OBELISK (42A. Luxor Temple sight); ERECTS (43D. Assembles); EXONERATES (11D. Clears); ANABOLISM (32D. Process of molecular synthesis); TETRAD (47A. The classical elements, e.g.); NTEST (47A. Big bang creator); and the very wet LETHE (22A. River in Hades).

Dante submerged in the River Lethe, by Gustave Dore: illustration from The Purgatorio.

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Action, emotion and condition includes LIED (8D Invented things); STAYSAT (24A. Occupies); LEERAT (27A. Not view innocently); STAND (30A. Something to take in court); NAPE (33A. Rabbit punch landing site); FREED (39A. Let out); HYPER (44A. Bouncing off the walls); SEAMY (57A. Squalid); TYPE (59A. Disclosure on eHarmony); MIS (4D. Fire starter?); RINK (12D. Flames shoot in it); PASTE (15D. Belt); STONE (24D. Pit); Sneak APEEK (28D.); SINKS (20A. Settles); AXED (53D. Dumped); APTLY (41D. Well); and MAD (56D. Unbalanced).

TEND (29D. Lean) and DTEN (36A. Call in the game Battleship) pair up anagrammatically mid-puzzle -- the remaining clues are the acrosses 18. Where to find lifesavers, for short; 31. Orsk is on it; 37. “Without ANET” (Grateful Dead album); 49. Keys; 51. Org. that can’t be lax about LAX?. The downs include 1. Something to put on before trying?; 3. Goes right; 13. They’re tapped; 23. Publication with an annual “Green Issue”); 26. “TRYTO Forget” (Harbach/Kern tune); 30. Plane wing part; 47. Leaves home?; 48. One before four; 51. Top pick, slangily; 52. Scena segment.

Did I forget CESTLAVIE (58A. “Oh well”)!

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05.29.08 -- Across & Down

Drawing Hands M. C. Escher
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Thursday, May 29, 2008

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Puzzle by John Farmer, edited by Will Shortz
This is one of those crosswords that requires far more words to explain than are involved. In this case, we are dealing with a mere five squares.
Five squares in this very clever crossword contain ACROSS/DOWN. I'll just use a blank square () to indicate both words in this commentary. However, when looking at the across clues, read the square as ACROSS and for the down clues, read it as DOWN. The five pairs of words are as follows:
ONE(1A. First clue) and BEAT (4D. Jazz/blues monthly);
GOHILL (13D. Hit the skids) and STRETCHES (18A. Spans, as a river);
GETPAT (26D. Master) and MOVETOWN (35A. Relocate from one side to the other);
LOOKON (39D. Scorn) and THESTREET (58A. Facing one’s house from a short distance away, say);
UPSIDE (45D. Inverted) and CUT(68A. Transect).
The rest of the puzzle is fairly straight-forward, with two eleven-letter across entries, ARSENIOHALL (29A. “Coming to America” co-star), I entered Eddie Murphy first, and ONEMANBANDS (46A. Versatile performers), a good example is Professor Gizmo one-man-band Tiger Rag.
The four corners of the crossword contain additional seven-letter entries each. Upper left, OLESTRA (1D. Faux fat); NARTHEX (2D. Church vestibule) and EMIRATE (3D. Arab territory). Upper right, AREAMAP (11D. Handy guide for a walking tour) and INSCALE (12D. Relative to dimensions); lower left, INVITRO (40D. Like some fertility lab techniques) and LEATHER (41D. Hide in a closet?); and lower right, CARIBOU (43D. Game in the Arctic) and PRESENT (44D. On hand).
Six-letter entries include ASSISI (57A. St. Clare’s birthplace); BETRAY (49D. Stab in the back); BRETON (8D. Celt of NW France); NEXTTO (48D. Adjoining); QATARI (9D. Doha dweller); STRAPS (20A. Spots for Velcro).
Five-letter, ACURA, AGORA, BARBQ, ACURA, ISAAC, OYVEY, PEETE, PIANO, TANTO, THATI, TIRES, WESTS. Four-letter, ABED, AONE, APES, ARNO, ASWE, ATOY, BASS, CIAO, ERIE, HAIG, LILO, NEWT, NORM, OPEL, OREL, POKE, TONE. Three-letter: ACH, ACT, ARP, AXE, CPU, ENV, ETE, HAH, KIT, MOM, OKD, OVA, RET, RUR, and finally, MAI and TAI.
I can't imagine anyone able to write small enough to cram both ACROSS and DOWN into those tiny little squares, nor is there an available symbol lurking in my font file -- so for the following diagram, it's a big black dot! I mean, enough is enough, what?...I should use a magnifying glass!

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Across: 5. Outdoor wingding; 10. Secretary of state after Muskie; 14. Innocent; 15. Acura; 16. Arno; 17. Erie; 22. See 27-Across; 23. Oktoberfest exclamation; 24. “You’re the one ___ Want”; 25. Ancient square; 27. With 22-Across, order at a tiki bar; 28. Not active: Abbr.; 32. Let go; 33. ___ Scamander, pseudonym of J. K. Rowling; 34. Auto on the autobahn; 39. Title girl in a 2002 Disney film; 42. Go slowly (along); 43. Chip in a Dell, briefly; 50. Abstract art pioneer Jean; 51. Some modern donations; 52. Quarterback Rodney; 53. Bike shop stock; 55. Word with press or mess; 56. Business no., maybe; 62. In dreamland, perhaps; 63. City on the Oka; 64. Non ___ (not so much, in music); 65. Blue-ribbon; 66. Par for the course; 67. Kvetcher’s cry. Down: 5. Grouper, e.g.; 6. Do something dramatic; 7. Sci-fi debut of 1921; 10. “Fat chance!”; 19. “I’m outta here!”; 21. A Baldwin; 25. “For ___ all know…”; 30. Excite, with “up”; 31. Sweetums; 35. MTV’s “Date My ___”; 36. Blush adds it; 37. Sanctioned; 38. Novelists Nathanael and Rebecca; 47. “Tarzan of the ___”; 54. Hall-of-Fame Nascar racer Bobby; 57. “This is not ___” (warning label); 59. Hardwood source; 60. Stationer’s item: Abbr.; 61. Printemps follower.

05.28.08 -- BALLS

Spheres by Andres Reinot
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Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Click here for abridged post in LARGE PRINT.

Puzzle by C. W. Stewart, edited by Will Shortz

BALLS (38A. Word that can follow the starts of 17-, 21-, 58- and 64-Across and 3- and 40-Down) heads the inter-related entries of today’s crossword: BLACKTIE (17A. Fund-raiser wear, perhaps); BUTTERCUP (21A. Yellow flower); GUMERASER (58A. Artist’s smudge); HIGHNOON (64A. 1952 Gary Cooper western); MEATHEAD (3D. “All in the Family” nickname); and SOFTSOAP (40D. Cajole).

Seven-letter entries include BLATANT (33A. Lacking subtlety), CHARLES (18D. Son of Elizabeth II); ROPESIN (9A. Lures); STEPPER (43A. Fancy dancer); TELLSON (36D. Fingers); and TIERING (44D. Arranging in rows).

Six-letter: ALLFOR (50A. Completely behind) and AVERSE (26A. Not at all eager); AMULET (47D. Repeller of evil); DOMINO (48D. Pizza box logo); ELIXIR (63A. Cure-all) and FAKERS (4D. Quacks); LAPSES (34D. Breaks in concentration); LECHER (51D. Aqualung, e.g., in the 1971 Jethro Tull album); MINCED (11D. Like the contents of egg rolls); SECURE (12D. Nail down); SOVIET (15A. Bygone political council); SPENCE (19A. Superlawyer Gerry); TENANT (55A. Lucy or Ricky, to Fred and Ethel); TOOTLE (22D. Fife sound).

Five-letter: ALIBI (6D. Out); BASRA (30D. Iraqi port); BATHE (20A. Take a soak); BEGET (46D. Sire); COSTS (60A. Goes for); EBBED (28D. Fell off); EMOTE (52A. Play broadly); TONGS (69. Server’s tool); GRIPE (56D. Show dissatisfaction); LIEUT (7D. Fuzz of “Beetle Bailey,” e.g.: Abbr.); OVERT (10D. In the open); PROMS (8A. Some limo destinations); REHAB (55D. It might start with detox); STERE (25A. Metric volume measure); TEPEE (16D. Hide-covered abode);TEXAN (53D. Either President Bush).

Four-letter: APSE, ARTS, ATLI, BEAR, BIBB, CEDE, ESPY, FOAL, LORE, PSST, REAL, SNIP, TORE, UCLA.

Three-letter: ALP, ARC, ARI, BAD, BUM, DEE, ERG, EST, GSA, HAR, ICE, IDS, ITO, OBI, OTT, PEP, PRO, VEE, YER.
.
.
Balls!
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Across: 1. No-good; 4. Stable newborn; 13. Motel sign; 14. Chief Hun, in Scandinavian legend; 23. Guffaw syllable; 24. 1989 world champion skater; 32. Flesh-and-blood; 37. Turn over; 39. Catch sight of; 45. Stories like Washington chopping down the cherry tree; 45. No longer edible; 49. Photo badges and such; 67. Vaulted area, often; 68. N.L. West team, on scoreboards; 70. Put up with; 71. Vinegar, so to speak. Down: 1. Lettuce variety; 2. Pac-10 sch. 5. Little Giant of the Giants; 8. “Hey, over here!”; 26. Rainbow, e.g.; 27. Winner’s sign; 35. Peak in Valais; 41. Whiz; 42. “So’s ___ mother!”; 59. Dance and drama; 61. Floored it; 62. Prune a bit; 65. Fed. Property agency.

05.27.08 -- ID

Merle Oberon, 1946 -- Courtesy of Universal Pictures and The Kobal Collection
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Tuesday, May 27, 2008
Click here for abridged post in LARGE PRINT.
Puzzle by Adam G. Perl, edited by Will Shortz
NOID (52A. Reason to be barred from a bar… or the theme of this puzzle), along with three missing ID entries, SCENEOFANACC__ENT (17A. E.S.L. class, perhaps?); CONTINENTALDIV__E (36A. Seedy hangout across the Atlantic?); and RAP__RESPONSETEAM (56A. Hip-hop critics?) are the main inter-related entries of this Tuesday back-to-work crossword.
Three more sets of inter-related entries occur with MERLE (34A. With 44-Down, “Wuthering Heights” actress) and OBERON (44D. See 34-Across); SALTAWAY (29A. Save for a rainy day) and DEPOSIT (43A. Bank receipts); and by merit of their Shortzesque clues, WAIVE (30D. Give up) and YIELD (32D. Give up). Here’s Merle Oberon and Laurence Olivier in the one-minute version of Wuthering Heights.
Other six-letter entries include CARTEL (19D. OPEC, e.g.); CLOSES (5D. Winds up); DEFEND (45A. Go to bat for); DENSER (45D. Less astute); INSANE (37D. Out of one’s mind); REPROS (26A. They’re not original); and TACOMA (10D. Puget Sound city).
Five-letter: ALVIN (31D. Chipmunk of pop music); AORTA (22A. Main line); ARISE (61A. Get off one’s behind); CROWD (5A. Three, it’s said); ERODE (27D. Eat away); LEMON (15A. Slot machine fruit); MEETS (34D. Track team schedule); NEEDY (41A. Down-and-out); PARTY (24D. Kegger, e.g.); PINUP(28D. Locker photo, maybe); PREEN (49A. Primp); RACED (26D. Did a 10K, e.g.); REFER (6D. Direct, as for info); RINSE (48D. Shampoo bottle instruction); SEDER (64A. Meal with readings); and SENDS (29D. Thrills).
Four-letter: ADAM, ADEN, ALII, ARIA, ASST, AVIS, BANS, BRAT, BRER, DEFY, DICE, ELEE, ELLA, EMIL; EPEE, ESTA, EURO, EVIL, HAIR, NEIN, NINE, OMAR, OREO, OVER, PEEN, PERL, PERM, PROP, RARE, RELY, SIDE, TELE, TINT, TOTE, USER.
Three-letter: ALI, DNA, EDU, MEN, PRE, SAS, TAP, TEN, THE, WON (8D. Took all the marbles).
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Across: 1. “Fall” guy; 10. Saks sack, say; 14. Fries or slaw; 16. Enterprise alternative; 20. Our base system; 21. Word before fee or group; 23. Harris’s ___ Rabbit; 24. It’ll curl your hair; 33. Diva’s delivery; 35. Title role for Will Smith; 40. Web address ending; 42. Demon’s doing; 47. Makes verboten; 48. Depend; 49. Primp; 52. Supreme Court count; 53. Everyday article; 60. Cookie with its name on it; 62. Et ___; 63. Hammer part; 65. 1995 Physics Nobelist Martin L. ___. Down: 1. Part of T.A.: Abbr.; 2. Parcheesi pair; 3. Mideast’s Gulf of ___; 4. Loo sign; 7. Actor Epps; 8. Took all the marbles; 9. Double-helix material; 11. Frequent word from ham operators; 12. TV control; 13. “C√≥mo __ usted?”; 18. Lira’s replacement; 23. Kid you might feel like smacking; 25. First name in scat; 38. Ja’s opposite; 39. Go against; 46. Gen. Robt. ___; 49. Telephone on a stage, e.g.; 50. Pink inside; 51. Blunted blade; 53. Start to communicate?; 54. “Aquarius” musical; 55. Disney’s “___ and the Detectives”; 57. Carrier to Bergen; 58. Opposite of post-; 59. Bill (Bojangles) Robinson’s forte.

05.26.08 -- To Tell the Tooth

The Fairy Queen by Sophie Anderson
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Monday, May 26, 2008

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Puzzle by Mark Sherwood, edited by Will Shortz
At one time in Europe, there was a tradition to bury baby teeth that fell out. The most commonly accepted belief by academics is the fairy's development from the tooth mouse, depicted in an 18th century French language fairy tale. In "La Bonne Petite Souris," a mouse changes into a fairy to help a good Queen defeat an evil King by hiding under his pillow to torment him and knocking out all his teeth. -- Tooth Fairy, Wikipedia.
Now that makes for good business for DENTISTS (29A. Experts with the ends of 17- and 55-Across and 10- and 24-Down); with KNEEBRACES (17A. Strap-on leg supports); PIEFILLING (55A. Mincemeat, e.g.); BLASTINGCAP (10D. It sets things off); TRIPLECROWN (24D. Feat for Secretariat) -- the inter-related entries of this Monday, Memorial Day crossword puzzle.
A good-looking smile is important in Showbiz, which gets a fair representation with ACTOR (1A. Irons or Woods); BOZO (10A. Classic clown); SARDI (14A. Old Big Apple restaurateur); SEX (20A. Reason for an R rating); SISKEL (22A. Film critic Gene) and EBERT (60A. 22-Across’s longtime partner); Fox’s “American IDOL” [39A.]; JONI (50A. Mitchell who sang “Big Yellow Taxi”); CANE (2D. Chaplin prop); TATUM (31D. Jazz great Art); HEIDI (27D. Title heroine played by Shirley Temple in 1937); “Come Back, Little SHEBA” [32D.]; PALME d’Or (Cannes award) [34D.] .
The Dentist, 1622 -- Gerrit van Honthorst (1590-1659), Staatlische Kunstammlungen of Dresden.
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Today’s puzzle doubles up a few entries. Forming a cross in the center of the puzzle are DAVID (37A. Michelangelo masterpiece) and DOVES (29D. Hawks’ opposites). Scattered through the puzzle are other pairs such as SOARS (30D. Goes up, up, up) and SORES (63A. Things to salve); PACE (7D. Show worry in the waiting room, maybe) and PAVE (15A. Put blacktop on); ZANE (12D. Western writer Grey) and ZACH (47D. 2007 Masters champion Johnson); OPART (6D. Some psychedelic designs) and OPAL (6A. Iridescent gem); OINK (11D. Sound piggish) and BOAR (49D. Wild hog).
Other notables: DARKSPOT (37D. Appearing and disappearing feature on Jupiter); LESSENED (9D. Decreased); FIREARMS (42A. Rifle and revolver); SIMILES (41D. “Fresh as a daisy” and others); RIBCAGE (5D. Chest protector); CHARGE (26A. Cavalry cry); MIASMA (44A. Poisonous atmosphere) and ZEBRAS (47A. Football refs) the other longer entries of the crossword.
The remaining acrosses: 16. Word repeated before “pants on fire”, LIAR; 19. Sister of Prince Charles, ANNE; 21. Apple seeds’ location, CORE; 24. Without slack, TAUT; 25. Lady’s partner, GENT; 33. Eagle’s next, AERIE; 34. Cornmeal bread, PONE; 35. Biblical flood survivor, NOAH; 36. Lame gait, LIMP; 38. Event proceeds, GATE; 40. Away from the storm, ALEE; 41. Cancel, at Cape Canaveral, SCRUB; 45. Part of a birthday celebration, CAKE; 46. Waste reservoir, SUMP; 51. “TIS the season …”; 54. “Peek-ABOO, I see you!”; 55. Gullet, CRAW; 59. Bones: Lat., OSSA; 61. Middle of many a steering wheel, HORN; 62. Wed. follower, THUR.
Downs: 1. Seeks info, ASKS; 3. "Jurassic Park" giant, informally, TREX: 4. Poem often titled “To a …”, ODE; 8. “AVE Maria”; 13. Baseball’s Hershiser, OREL; 18. Rakish sort, ROUE; 23. Bank statement abbr., INT; 25. Three wishes granter, GENIE; 26. Sacramento’s state: Abbr., CALIF; 28. Knight’s protection, ARMOR; 43. Org. that helps with tow service, AAA; 45. 44. Tax-exempt investment, for short, MUNI; To date, SOFAR; 48. Longest Spanish river, EBRO; 50. Bach’s “JESU, Joy of Man’s Desiring”; 51. Level, TIER; 52. Legal memo starter, INRE; 53. Some noncoms: Abbr., SGTS; 56. Approximately: Suffix, ISH; 57. Debt-incurring Wall St. deal, LBO.
Floss!

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05.25.08 -- MARTINI

Sunday, May 25, 2008

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SPY GLASS, Puzzle by Elizabeth C. Gorski, edited by Will Shortz

A note for this puzzle reads “When this puzzle is done, the seven circles will contain the letters from A to G. Starting with A, connect them alphabetically with one continuous line, and you'll get an image of a 39-Across.”

Well, I didn’t go connecting circles, but 39-Across is MARTINI (See instructions in Notepad), with its symmetric partner below, ASPIRIN (97A. Offering from St. Joseph) -- is that a coincidence?

IANFLEMING (90A. Writer born May 28, 1908) will be one hundred years old this coming Wednesday, but this puzzle has beat him to it!

With it's clever SPY GLASS title, we are asked to remember six actors who have played the role of 72D. JAMES (Bond common to the answers to the six starred clues) which, together with the aforementioned MARTINI and IANFLEMING, bind the inter-related entries of this Sunday of Memorial Day weekend crossword -- no fireworks here, just a half-dozen smooth operators: SEANCONNERY (3D. *1962-67, 1971); GEORGE LAZENBY (23A. *1969); ROGERMOORE (48A. *1973-85); TIMOTHYDALTON (68A. *1987-89); PIERCEBROSNAN (115A. *1995-2002); and DANIELCRAIG (71D. *2006- ), with SIR (33D. Title for 48-Across and 3-Down) for the two most senior members of the club.

The rest of the action in this puzzle is business-as-usual with a few exceptions as noted.

Across: 1. How architects’ models are built; 8. Lou Bega’s “MAMBO No. 5”; 13. Ottoman V.I.P.’s; 18. Foyer item; 19. Plug in a travel kit; 21. It may give you a cold shoulder; 22. Alarming; 25. Auditioned for “American Idol”; 26. Italian town known for its embroidery; 28. End of a plumb line; 29. Law assignment; 30. Garbage hauler; 32. “True”; 35. Neighborhood next to N.Y.C.’s East Village; 37. Ecuador and Venezuela are in it; 41. Relating to a blood line; 45. Sub systems; 47. Suffix with urban; 50. Moles’ production; 52. Subj. for bilinguals; 54. Like some video, to cable customers; 55. Warhol’s “ASET of Six Self-Portraits”; 56. Lambs’ kin; 58. Aside (from); 61. “Smooth Operator” singer; 62. French seas; 63. Power site, maybe; 64. First mate; 65. Put ITIN writing!”; 67. Layer; 71. Figures at many a wedding reception, briefly; 74. Kite flier’s wish; 75. Muscle mag displays; 76. Sneaky; 77. Semitic deity; 78. Med. Plans; 80. Gut course; 82. Alexander Hamilton’s last act; 83. “By the power vested INME…”; 84. Aches; 86. N.B.A.’s YAO Ming; 88. Ventured (forth); 93. Speech pauses; 95. Surprisingly; 96. Brings out; 99. Willy Wonka’s creator; 100. OSSO buco; 102. Mexican beer; 103. A great deal; 105. “Lost” filming locale; 108. Global currency org.; 110. 2003 best-selling fantasy novel by teen author Christopher Paolini; 113. Beethoven’s third?; 119. New Jersey city, county or river; 121. Name-drop, maybe?; 122. Least restrained; 123. Artist Watteau; 124. Ward off; 125. Singer Jones and others; 126. Piano players’ hangouts.

Down : 1. Old Propaganda; propagator; 2. Ocean menaces; 4. Attire with supersized pockets; 5. “Exodus” hero; LUNA 9, first spacecraft to land softly on the moon; 7. Deviled things; 8. Chairman’s supporter?; 9. Natl. Poetry Mo.; 10. Brief encounter?; 11. Programme airer, with “the”; 12. Knee sock material; 13. Wood shaper; 14. Like some wrestling, (which ends up looking like THIS); 15. Tennis star Mandlikova; 16. Edwards and others: Abbr.; 17. Eye doctor’s concern; 19. Shakes up; 20. Hungers; 24. On; 27. California’s SIMI Valley; 31. “WERE #1!”; 33. Title for 48-Across and 3-Down; 34. Lennon’s mate; 36. Nears, with “on”; 38. “The Allegory of Love” writer, 1936; 40. Kurchatov who oversaw the Soviet atomic bomb project; 42. Lowly one; 43. Composer of “Dido and Aeneas”; 44. Spearheaded; 45. Sign of approval; 46. White-collared thrush: Var.; 49. Authorizes; 51. Butterfly experts, perhaps; 53. March 25, in the Christian calendar; 57. It can be fragile; 59. Residences, in slang; 60. Drs.’ org.; 64. Ship-to-ship communication; 66. In song, “Once you pass its borders, you can ne’er return again”; 68. Fights; 69. Cable TV inits.; 70. Baton Rouge sch.; 73. Runners’ locales; 74. It’s full of holes; 77. Rock guitarist once married to Goldie Hawn; 78, Commander; 79. Plan for dinner; 81. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit; 82. Alpha; 84. Disapproving cry; 85. Bluesy Smith; 87. Night lights; 89. Rich soil; 91. Homeland protection org.; 92. Main mailbox locale: Abbr.; 94. Sweater flaw; 98. Castle and Cara; 101. Game played with a 40-card deck; 104. “Romanzero” poet; 103. Phone co. employee; 106. Suffix with billion; 107. Jalopy; 109. Univ. house; 111. Autumn birthstone; 112. Second start?; 114. Clinches; 116. Hanna-Barbera art; 117. German direction: 118. SHA Na Na; 120. Disco buy on "The Simpsons".

Hey! Draw in the martini... a timely toast to "Bond, James Bond!"

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